Why PR is best placed to help businesses with social media

Many business people and marketers automatically assume that digital agencies have the most expertise when it comes to social media. Surely it’s a natural leap […]

Many business people and marketers automatically assume that digital agencies have the most expertise when it comes to social media. Surely it’s a natural leap from HTML and banner ads to working online in a more social capacity?

At salt we have a different perspective. We believe beyond doubt that PR is best placed to run social media.

PR experts are conversationalists and relationship experts: that’s why they can more readily understand the way the social web works. To gain the most impact in the social media environment, you need to create something that we hold very dear to our hearts: sustainable conversations.

PR people cut their teeth by creating content and campaigns that satisfy client communications imperatives, that the media will tolerate, and that interest consumers. This gives us unique insight into which campaigns go on to create sustainable conversations and so drive debate. Plus today, we have the expertise and listening tools to manage relationships and take audience engagement to a whole new level.

The very essence of social media is an open dialogue between brands and consumers in a space where everyone is a reporter. Get this relationship wrong and you could be calling in your PR advisors to deal with unsustainable and inappropriate conversations that have provoked a communications crisis.

Finally, PR practitioners as expert content producers are properly placed not only to take a look at the bigger picture – making sense of the social media landscape – but to create enduring campaigns that foment lasting relationships between a brand and its consumers.

Sustainable conversations allow brands to blaze a trail with compelling content that really matters to global audiences. You can very quickly turn from being reactive to proactive, creating evangelists and making informed decisions on what conversations you want to advocate yourself.

By Sophie Griffiths